5.28 Lee Callahan’s Public Affairs Show

National Alliance on Mental Health
Lauren B. Simonds, Executive Director of NAMI of Washington, talks about her organization and upcoming fundraiser on  Saturday, June 3, 2017 at Marina Park, Kirkland.
NAMIWalks is Washington State’s largest annual stigma busting mental health awareness event. Thank you for an amazing 2016 NAMIWalks! Together, more than 1,300 participants raised crucial mental health awareness and more than $294,000 to fund NAMI’s mental health education, support, and advocacy efforts – all offered at no cost to those we serve. Register today here.
 
Hear Lauren B. Simonds here:
 

 

Rahawa Haile’s article in this month’s edition of Outdoor Magazine
What happens when an African American woman decides to solo-hike the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine during a summer of bitter political upheaval? Everything you can imagine, from scary moments of racism to new friendships to soaring epiphanies about the timeless values of America’s most storied trekking route. Like many through-hikers, Rahawa Haile quit her job, ended her relationship, and set out from Georgia on the long walk north. She sought peace in the wilderness and nursed her aching feet. But the Appalachian Trail can be a lonely experience when you’re solo, female, and black.
 
Hear Rahawa Haile here:
 

 

May is National Stroke Awareness Month
Cindy Cooke, President of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, tells us how to spot the warning signs of stroke. But it’s not just stroke we want your audience to be aware of, it’s that young adults are having strokes at an increasingly alarming rate and 73% of them have no idea how to spot the warning signs of stroke. If you’d like to focus on stroke awareness and prevention and what folks need to know then I can also have Cindy Cooke, President of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) on to speak from the health care provider perspective. Either way, stroke is a serious condition and on the rise in America – you listeners need to know the signs and symptoms to help save lives.
 
Hear Cindy Cooke here:
 

 
An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back
Harvard-trained medical doctor and veteran journalist Elizabeth Rosenthal explains how in the last twenty-five years healthcare has become a business, pure and simple. Across the country the fierce debate about what to do about the high cost of healthcare is raging. Elected officials in Washington are at odds over what to do about it, but the American people know one thing: no matter the kind of coverage, the price is too high and the system is broken. In her new book, An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back, Harvard-trained medical doctor and veteran journalist Elizabeth Rosenthal explains how in the last twenty-five years healthcare has become a business, pure and simple. The prime driver is no longer what’s best for the patient, but what’s best for revenue. We are all experiencing increasing out-of-pocket costs: rising insurance premiums, copayments and deductibles; routine office visits billed at hundreds of dollars; surprise “out-of-network” costs for tests we’re told are necessary; skyrocketing drugs that are relatively inexpensive one day suddenly sky-rocket overnight. No reform addresses the unsustainable cost of getting sick.
 
Hear Elizabeth Rosenthal here:
 

 

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