Today In History: A Coke-Addict Is Born, Six-Mil-Man Says Bye-bye, And Slash Gets His Hat Back

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Ronald Martinez
Getty Images Sport

Ronald Martinez
Getty Images Sport

First, the birthdays:

Alleged Coke addict and Politician Marion Barry Jr. is 77. Supremes singer Mary Wilson is 69.Pink Floyd’s Rock and Roll Hall of Famer David Gilmour is 67. Emmy Award-winning actor and director Rob Reiner is 66. Singer Kiki Dee is 66. 1976 duet with Elton John “Don’t Go Breaking My Heart.” Stedman Graham is 62. He is the partner of Oprah Winfrey. Actor, comedian Tom Arnold is 54.  (could be a former-coke addict, too…) Actress Suzanne Crough is 50. She’s best known for the role of Tracy on “The Partridge Family.” Former basketball star Shaquille O’Neal is 41. 

In 1950, Silly Putty was invented.  See if you can watch ALL of this incredibly boring ad.

In 1973, Larry Hisle of the Minnesota Twins became the first designated hitter in major league baseball history.

In 1976, Fleetwood Mac released the single “Rhiannon.”

In 1978, “The Six Million Dollar Man” aired for the final time on ABC.

Also in 1978, “Hustler” magazine publisher Larry Flynt was shot and left partially paralyzed in Lawrenceville, Georgia.

In 1981, CBS newsman Walter Cronkite signed off for the last time as anchorman of the “CBS Evening News.”  He was replaced by Dan Rather. 

In 1982, J. Geils Band’s “Freeze-Frame” broke into the Top 40.

In 1989, Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler and wife Theresa became parents to daughter Chelsea Anna.

In 1992, “The Cosby Show,” one of the most popular TV programs of all time, taped its last episode after eight years.  The final episode aired on April 29th.  

In 1993, Bon Jovi’s “Bed Of Roses” peaked at number ten on the pop singles chart.

In 1995, Bruce Springsteen showed up unannounced to jam with Soul Asylum at a New York City nightclub.

In 1996, Yoko Ono, backed by son Sean Lennon and his band, made a rare concert appearance at the Knitting Factory in New York City.

In 2000, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and James Taylor were among the inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Also in 2000, three white New York City police officers were convicted of a cover-up in a brutal police station attack on Haitian immigrant Abner Louima.  Just last week, an appeals court overturned the convictions.

In 2004
David Crosby was arrested in New York after he returned to a hotel to retrieve a bag he left that contained marijuana, a knife, and a loaded gun. He was released from custody on 35-hundred-dollars bail.

In 2005
Velvet Revolver guitarist Slash got his black top hat back. The hat had disappeared during the Grammy Awards ceremony a month earlier.

In 2007, J.P. Richardson — better known as The Big Bopper — was exhumed and his remains examined at a Beaumont, Texas mortuary. The new autopsy refuted allegations of foul play in the small plane crash that killed him, Buddy Holly, and Ritchie Valens in February 1959. The forensic anthropologist who did the exam found no indication that the crash was anything more than a tragic accident. Richardson’s remains were reburied in a more prominent plot at Beaumont, Texas’ Forest Lawn Cemetery, marked with a life-size bronze statue of him.

Also in 2007, The planned premiere of the John Lennon film “3 Days in the Life” at South Berwick, Maine’s Berwick Academy was cancelled just hours before the screening, when school officials received a letter from Yoko Ono’s attorneys threatening legal action if the movie was shown.

In 2011
Meat Loaf began his run on NBC’s “The Celebrity Apprentice.”

In 2012
Rush was named a recipient of Canada’s Governor General’s Performing Arts Award. The prize includes a cash award of 25-thousand-dollars from the Canada Council for the Arts and a commemorative medallion from the Royal Canadian Mint.

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