You Stay Classy, New Jersey

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In my humble opinion, vanity plates are the Ed Hardy shirt of the automotive world.  If you have one on, you’re more than likely out of the “what’s acceptable” loop of society.

In New Jersey, a place where Ed Hardy is king, one little hammered piece of tin managed to weave its way into my vanity plate hating heart.  Kim Romano, a classy dame hailing from the Garden State, has been forced to turn in her license plates because they are “offensive.”  In every other circumstance, I would be cheering the DMV Gods for saving my eyeballs from this visual trainwreck but not today.  What in the world could be so offensive on a plate that we’re discussing it over here on the left side of the country, you ask?  I hope you’re sitting down before you read this:

BIOCH.

Mrs. Romano has been rolling deep throughout the town of Manville with her little show of free speech for four years.  It wasn’t until an anonymous tattle tale tipster called her plates in for being tacky. 

“It sort of makes me feel like almost an invasion of privacy or taking away your freedom of speech,” said Romano, 49, a mom of three grown sons.

“It’s a plate. It’s not a word really. It’s made up, and if you want to get technical, it’s spelled b-i-o-t-c-h.” Kim Romano, potty mouth.

In a world where we’ve grown up from not even being able to say anything remotely profane on network TV to having a hit movie like “Kick Ass” able to place spots on that very network in 2010, you have to ask:  is this really that big of a deal?

If you don’t think so, the Washington State Department of Licensing still has a license plate with “bioch” waiting for you.  I checked.

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